Archive for the The downside of Opensource Category

What a wanK!

Posted in hass(le)io, The downside of Opensource on July 15, 2019 by asteriondaedalus

So, to date. Things that don’t seem to work out of box on Raspberry Pi 3B+ hass(le)io (either 32 or 64 bit) are:

  • cloud9 ide
  • node-red
  • portainer
  • a few others that I can’t be bothered listing

Now the problem might be mine. It seems though that the setting up of the config files is trickier than it should be. This is aided and abetted by “help” files that don’t.

Idiomatically, a templated warning on many “help” files is “Don’t use this config file, write your own”. The example config in the “help” file acting, as it were, as taunt.

The problem turns out, if you cut and paste the example config files, from the “help”, many of them cause errors! They don’t, therefore, act as a example of a straight forward, no bells’n’whistles, get you started type of example.

What seems to be missing, in peoples puny attempts at “help”, is:

  1. Help should not assume users have full architect status in the project, and understand not everyone has the priori knowledge of an architect OR even the plug-in developer.
  2. See point 1.

Certainly, when some of the error logs are reporting potentially missing files, nested deep in the Docker image, then the fact that the Docker image is not ready for production, and shouldn’t be on the streets, is laid bare.

Some of this is the open source, the user is the tester. Or worse, the user is a developer. I know that there is a derogatory name, in the open source community, for users who don’t contribute. I admit I am one. What I marvel at is the pressure to contribute is a counter argument to the utility of open source, since if I can’t use the software due to useability, installability, understandability, portability or other software quality problems then I am not likely to be much help because of the inherent problems, generally, with open source in the areas of useability, installability, understandability, portability.

That is, if using the software is my goal, getting involved in all the open source code bases I might opt to use for my projects is not an aspiration, BECAUSE I am officially bored with the quality of open source software in terms of useability, installability, understandability, portability.

You should be too. Especially now that open source projects are whining over “pay me for my time”. YOU FREAKS! You were the types that set up the free software rort. You would have been passing floppies of stolen software around, putting companies out of business. SUCK IT UP YOU PRINCESSES!

Pardon my grumpy pants. I will actually buy a beer, if the option is there, if the software meets my expectations on useability, installability, understandability, portability. Not, however, if in the first hour I am having to debug what should be straight forward, or clearly explained.

I did managed to get the Aircast running, no changes to config needed other than, it seems, turning SSL flag to false. That was a punt I took, as the default (SSL=true) raise a error when you tried the web UI link. That “fix”, applied to the other apps above, did not fix them.

Aircast is great, since I have a C.H.I.P. running shairpoint-sync under the television. So, as chrome-cast is attached to television, I can free up a airplay speaker.

The other app that seems to run fine is motioneye, which is a CCTV monitoring thing. Same thing, came up after setting SSL=false. CCTV around the place was my next project for the home, so sweet.

The configurator works, so at least I can play with the scripting.

Otherwise, I am running the hass(le)io based RPI3B+ side by side my OPiZ.

The OPiZ is running Mosquito and node-red just fine, except for the system going down about once a month.

Psyched!

Posted in Rant, The downside of Opensource on March 20, 2019 by asteriondaedalus

So, OpenMV M7 from ebay.  Watchout!

The price compared well with the OpenMV store, which reported out of stock on M7.

So, I bought of ebay.

The problem, it appears there is a need to register the boards with OpenMV to get access to the OpenMV IDE. 

The board from ebay is registerable BUT it costs $15 per board, in addition to the purchase price, if it doesn’t come registered via OpenMV.

I otherwise assume that the boards from OpenMV come pre-registered, since the registration make sense.  It makes sense because open hardware is a way to no make money, since you give up your IP and it then gets copied.  Adding board registration, though not really open sourcy, seems like a good way to make sure the software side stays viable. 

Sure, copy and sell the boards.  You don’t have to pay a licence BUT the user buying your board does.  So, why charge the same as a registered board from OpenMV?

Rip off?

Not really, the OpenMV M7 is USD$65, I paid AUD$61 then AUD$21 to register so that’s AUD$82 which is AUD$10 cheaper than the USD$65.

The scary part being what, if like FDTI chips, you couldn’t register clones. Now that would be saucy.

Crap!

Posted in Rant, The downside of Opensource on November 11, 2018 by asteriondaedalus

So, found I couldn’t run tensorflow on my laptop as the older i5 I am running is missing an instruction extension to support vectorisations.

I thought then to try to get cuda toolkit up so I could use pyCuda or Cuda accelerated pyTorch.

I got the nvidia driver installed for the GeForce GT 420M my laptop was running. Tricky since I am running Debian 9 Stretch and nvidia is anti-Debian.

Tried unsuccessfully to get pyCuda to talk to cuda toolkit.

There is no official support for the kit on Debian so I had to rely upon vain attempts by others.

I eventually found a good blurb on the problem, but my machine started blurting out app crash reports from the desktop. They kept coming through as often as I closed them. I decided to reboot.

DOH!

Laptop came up without desktop running.

A little poking round and I worked out that sddm was not running and would not run. So, no sddm, no x-windows, no desktop. Kulprit appeared to be the nvidia supplied driver for the 420M.

I tried uninstalling the nvidia driver but the driver uninstall defaults to not recovering your x-windows setup. Unfortunately, I must have twitched on the enter key so nvidia uninstall wiped itself clean, except for the x-windows config.

I poked around and found one config file that needed to have nvidia changed to nouveau BUT there was no information on the extent of mods to files required to manually backout of the nvidia driver callouts in the x-windows.

I was stuck with no desktop.

I also found I was now also sans wifi and likely few other things so I elected to rebuild the laptop (again). That is the standard approach to dealing with linux is it not. If only that was not such a drag.

He’s baaa … ack!

Posted in Orange Pi, The downside of Opensource, Ubuntu Core 16 on September 9, 2018 by asteriondaedalus

My Armbian troll, the moderator on Armbian who banned me from Armbian forum because I pointed out he was off topic and providing “interesting” but unrelated factoids, has popped up on Orange PI forum.  My Armbian troll has tagged my observations about the lack of readiness of Ubuntu CORE 16 and snap generally on Orange Pi Zero.

517283778-612x612

 

 

 

Fracking wanking open source user groups

Posted in The downside of Opensource, Ubuntu Core 16 on September 7, 2018 by asteriondaedalus

Well not really open source. It’s Ubuntu.

Ubuntu that commercial Debian front trying to steal back money having jumped on the “software should be free” band wagon.

So why are they operating like open source with dopey “user” forums?

Costs nothing right!  Worth as much.

Same old same old.

No “help”.  No bug reporting.  Everything must be  “question”.

My questions are not answered.  My questions earn, or not, “reputation”.  But they are not answered.

Over 100,000 unanswered questions on Ubuntu forums alone.

Many with “reputation” because they are, what? interesting?   But not answered.

My questions: Why is Ubuntu handing out images of CORE 16 that go into tight useless config prompt loops after first forced update?  Why am I having to go through this inane user group crap to “help” them sort their frackup?

Its as much as what I have seen in virus checkers when they frack up.

The user forums obfuscate the threat to the vendor reputation because the vendor has users in set-two mode, turning on one another for “reputation”, so you cannot gauge the impact to the community of the frack up.

So.  As usual if I answer my own questions the answers are immediately denounced as not answers.  They are not answers, of course, as to the literal niggly technical reason that the Ubuntu CORE 16 is fragged in the Orange Pi Zero distro.   That is, whether a flag was or wasn’t set just so.

The answer, however, is that the distro was released without proper testing.  That flag, you wankers, was supposed to be just so.

Ubuntu Core 16 on Orange Pi Zero: minus 1 billion reputation points.

Slowly

Posted in MQTT, node-red, Orange Pi, The downside of Opensource, Ubuntu Core 16 on September 6, 2018 by asteriondaedalus

So, 4 days ago I reported to node-red group that the –beta snap of node-red did not start as a service on armf version – at least when snapped onto Ubuntu Core 16 running on Orange Pi Zero.

When I started this journey, the following command would not download a snap but it would prompt:

sudo snap install node-red

The prompt would report there is no –stable version and I had to choose between –beta or –edge.

In fact, the snapcraft.io site also confirmed this as it only had a beta or edge version in the drop down for armf.

So I would install node-red with:

sudo snap install --beta node-red

But, as I mentioned, it did not start a node-red editor on :1880.

If I used the following:

snap services

It would report the mosquitto snap I snapped in was indeed running a service.

Et voila! If I typed the following:

sudo snap run node-red

Then node-red would run in foreground.

Not much use since it needed to run as a service.

Starting node-red as a service is easy peasy, if you read the help file, with:

sudo snap start node-red

Except, that raised the error “node-red ain’t got no stinking services to run” which confirmed that the –beta snap for node-red, at least the armf version, had something funky going on.

Curiously, on my freshly built laptop running amd64 version of debian 9 stretch, with snapd installed, the snap of –beta node-red ran as service immediately after install.

That points definitely to something funky going on in the armf Ubuntu Core 16 OPiZ combination.

Then, as likely because of my prompting, node-red community pushed a –stable version of node-red out to snapcraft.io (something like 4 hours ago as I type).   The youngest version, –edge, was 6 months ago.

So node-red didn’t have a –stable for armf!!  Some problem with their build (apparently).

Working with node-red community now to sort this.  Such a good Citizen I am.

gc

 

 

It’s a form of self flaggelation …

Posted in MQTT, node-red, Orange Pi, The downside of Opensource, thingbox, Ubuntu Core 16 on September 6, 2018 by asteriondaedalus

… this snap stuff.

What I have worked out so far with orangepi zero, Ubuntu Core 16 and Snap.

Ubuntu Core, because they force updates, is failing to come back after scheduled reboot. Or so it seems.

The serial port responds but the device is not on lan.

All attempts to attach at the IP address reported in the message displayed on the serial port fail.

Hard reset (power off, power on) brings board back up with new IP address but then the cycle repeats. Schedule reboot does not come back up.

Weird but if I use a sudo reboot the device comes back up with IP intact.

So, something about the core auto reboot.

I tried a debian server but snapd would not install. Rasbian apparently is a no go, so maybe they meant arm generally?

Otherwise, moquitto snaps and runs fine. The node-red snap installs but no service starts. No config comes with snap and snap start node-red returns no service available message. The node-red snap will otherwise run in foreground.